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The 58th Armored Field Artillery Battalion landed here 6 June 1944

Hot Steel: The Story of the 58th Armored Field Artillery Battalion

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the history of 58th armored field artillery battalion. 6 likes. book

1. The author has made an exhaustive (and exhausting) effort to read all the documents, journals, and reports belonging to each of the units mentioned-no matter how cursorily-in this chapter. Of course a great number of records were destroyed; this is particularly true of the artillery battalions. The journals of most of the engineer units are extant, but these vary greatly in value. Surprisingly, many of the ordnance and antiaircraft units provided records which helped considerably in unwinding the involved tactical situation in their particular area. Any reader wishing to delve further into the story should begin with the following records: the VIII Corps G-3 Journal and Artillery AAR; First U.S. Army, G-3 Journal; the 51st Engineer Combat Battalion S-3 Operations Journal (a model of what such a record should be); the very complete 158th Engineer Combat Battalion S-3 Journal; and the brief but graphic AAR of the 58th Armored Field Artillery Battalion (whose records weredestroyed).

There is a footnote to the events west of Bastogne on 22December-the story of the 58th Armored Field Artillery Battalion. Thisbattalion, commanded by Lt. Col. Walter J. Paton, had taken part in the fight atLongvilly and the ensuing withdrawal to Bastogne. With eight guns left the 58thwent into position west of the town to fire for the 101st Airborne. On theafternoon of the 21st, with the enemy on the prowl in every direction, thebattalion moved close to Tillet. Here it was cut off by enemy reconnaissanceunits, and Colonel Paton ordered his drivers and gunners to dig a foxhole circlearound guns and vehicles. Shortly after midnight a radio message came through:the battalion was to try to reach Bastogne. The column formed but had gone onlya little way when the tank at its head was knocked off by an antitank gun; thenmortars and machine guns raked the road. Returning to the position which it hadjust left, the battalion waited for daylight.

of 58th Armored Field Artillery Battalion (4th Infantry Division

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September 21, 2012 | History

Steel: The Story of the 58th Armored Field Artillery Battalion EBOOK

through Operation Torch in North Africa, Operation Husky in Sicily, and, after several rigorous training missions in England, from D-Day through VE-Day. It doesn’t glamorize the war, but neither does it repel the reader with gory details. It’s simply an account of the adventures, misadventures, triumphs and tragedies of a group of men – a band of brothers, if you will – who answered their country’s call and then got on with the rest of their lives.
My goal was not to write the history of World War II. I just wanted to imbue the reader with a sense of closeness to the action and to the men who went into that action. If I’ve succeeded even half as well as the 58th Armored Field Artillery Battalion succeeded in helping to rid the world of a monster, I’ve met my goal.

through Operation Torch in North Africa, Operation Husky in Sicily, and, after several rigorous training missions in England, from D-Day through VE-Day. It doesn’t glamorize the war, but neither does it repel the reader with gory details. It’s simply an account of the adventures, misadventures, triumphs and tragedies of a group of men – a band of brothers, if you will – who answered their country’s call and then got on with the rest of their lives.
My goal was not to write the history of World War II. I just wanted to imbue the reader with a sense of closeness to the action and to the men who went into that action. If I’ve succeeded even half as well as the 58th Armored Field Artillery Battalion succeeded in helping to rid the world of a monster, I’ve met my goal.