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Daoism from Philosophy to Religion

An Introduction to Daoist Philosophies

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Dao Companion to Daoist Philosophy | Xiaogan Liu | Springer

As Neo-Daoism entered its last phase, another Daoist work, theLiezi, came to rival the “Three Treatises on theProfound.” Zhang Zhan (ca. 330–400) wrote an importantcommentary on the work—indeed, some would argue that Zhang had ahand in the formation of the Liezi itself—in which herecapitulated many of the ideas that spanned the entire spectrum ofNeo-Daoist philosophy. What is of particular interest is that Zhangexplicitly introduced Buddhist ideas into Xuanxue.

LI Siming (Derek) is a spiritual teacher specializing in Daoist philosophy and non-duality. He has held lectures in Confucius, Daoist and Buddhist philosophy in the US, Hong Kong, and China. He is currently residing in Hong Kong, working full time as a transportation planner/engineer, and teaching part time as a Chinese philosophy, qigong and meditation teacher.

An Introduction to Daoist Philosophies ..

 
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Daoist Regimen; Daoist Philosophy

The Daoist sage Laozi is often shown riding on an ox or in an ox cart as he prepared to leave China by way of a pass to the West. Legend has it that he authored the , or Scripture of the Way and Virtue, when the guard at the pass asked him to write down his teachings. A small bronze sculpture () presents the sage in a full robe, topknot, and a long narrow beard. Images of the other paramount figure of Daoist philosophy, Zhuangzi, are less common, but () by the late thirteenth-century painter Zhou Dongqing evokes a famous passage from Zhuangzi’s writings about recognizing feelings of joy in others. Wu Boli’s () presents a Daoist manifestation of , or “cosmic energy,” as a powerful pine tree that recalls the double-S curve of the cosmic diagram. The horizontal () by the Daoist abbot Fang Congyi similarly transforms a mountain range into a writhing dragon vein of energy that uncoils out of the distance only to vanish into a misty void.

LI Siming (Derek) is a spiritual teacher specializing in Daoist philosophy and non-duality. He has held lectures in Confucius, Daoist and Buddhist philosophy in the US, Hong Kong, and China. He is currently residing in Hong Kong, working full time as a transportation planner/engineer, and teaching part time as a Chinese philosophy, qigong and meditation teacher.