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The Children of Green Knowe - L. M. Boston

The Children of Green Knowe

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What seasonal book, music or tv traditions do you have? The Nutcracker? The Snowman? The Bible? I like to read The Children of Green Knowe by Lucy M. Boston and On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (the wintery Bond story), and watch the tv adaptation of John Masefield’s The Box of Delights, first shown on the telly in December 1984, with the final episode going out on Christmas Eve, i.e. 27 years ago today. I think I must have seen it a bit later than this though.

The family seat is a castle named Green Noah on account of its ark like position above a flood plain. But it’s also a derivation of the ancient Green Knowe, a name with a terrible curse attached. It’s the perfect set up for that most comforting of traditions, the Christmas ghost story. But this isn’t quite like any other ghost story.

Illustrations of Green Knowe by Peter Boston.

  • 1 Synopses
    • 1.1 The Children of Green Knowe (1954)
    • 1.2 The Chimneys of Green Knowe (1958)
    • 1.3 The River at Green Knowe (1959)
    • 1.4 A Stranger at Green Knowe (1961)
    • 1.5 An Enemy at Green Knowe (1964)
    • 1.6 The Stones of Green Knowe (1976)
  • 2 Adaptation
  • 3 Children Of Green
  • 4 References

The children of Green knowe Episode 1 Part 1

Tolly lay awake in bed. There was so much to thinks about – the birds, the children, the floods, the stables where lovely Feste called for his master. It was a clear night with a full moon shining on miles of water and seeming twice as bright as usual. The bedroom was all silver and black with it as it poured through the window and flooded the floor with quicksilver. The flame of the night-light looked like a little golden pen-nib, giving less light than there was already around it. The moon shone in the rocking-horse’s eye, and in the mouse’s eye too when Tolly fetched it out from under his pillow to see. The clock went tick-tock, and in the stillness he thought he heard little bare feet running across the floor, then laughter and whispering, and a sound like the pages of a big book being turned over.‘ — The Children of Green Knowe, Lucy M Boston.

The family seat is a castle named Green Noah on account of its ark like position above a flood plain. But it’s also a derivation of the ancient Green Knowe, a name with a terrible curse attached. It’s the perfect set up for that most comforting of traditions, the Christmas ghost story. But this isn’t quite like any other ghost story.