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The Odyssey of Homer

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While stationed on a desolate R.A.F. outpost on the fringes of the Karachi desert in India, Lawrence began his acclaimed translation of The Odyssey. He devoted himself to the project for four years, and during that time he came to feel that he was uniquely suited to the task. "I have hunted wild boars and watched wild lions," he wrote. "Built boats and killed many men. So I have odd knowledges that qualify me to understand The Odyssey, and odd experiences that interpret it to me." Relying on an innate sense of language and truly gifted abilities at translation, Lawrence transformed Homer's Odyssey into mellifluous prose. The result was an overnight bestseller. The New York Herald Tribune hailed it "perhaps the most interesting translation of the world's most interesting book," and The New York Times called it "ruggedly and roughly masculine" and added that it "gives a vividness to the story beyond any other text familiar to us."

Lawrence Homer Coffee broke the color barrier in the rodeo profession with a horse and "two wraps and a hooey" which is cowboy talk for a half hitch knot. In the late fifties, early sixties, segregation was wide spread --from restaurants, to restrooms and the rodeo arena. Stepping out on faith, Lawrence, "Big Buckle" as he was known on the CB Radio, along with friends, took on the issue of race and rodeos one Texas arena at a time.

Lawrence Homer Profiles | Facebook

 Father:    Lawrence Homer Mechlin
 Born:    1915, MO    Marr:    1935    Died:     
 Mother:    Pauline Alice Fisher
 Born:         Died:     
 Michel Eugene Mechlin    
 Born:     Private  - 
 Marr:     Private  - 
 Died:      - 
 Other Spouses:    
 Joyce M. Love    
 Born:     Private  - 
    
 Died:      - 
 Other Spouses:    

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Funeral services for Lawrence Homer “Dad” Simon Sr., 101, will be at 6 p.m., today, Thursday, April 26, 2012, in St. Paul Baptist Church, with Rev. Purnell Trent, pastor, officiating. Burial will be at 11a.m. Friday in Peterson Cemetery under direction of Semien-Lewis Mortuary of Jennings.

Lawrence Homer Coffee broke the color barrier in the rodeo profession with a horse and "two wraps and a hooey" which is cowboy talk for a half hitch knot. In the late fifties, early sixties, segregation was wide spread --from restaurants, to restrooms and the rodeo arena. Stepping out on faith, Lawrence, "Big Buckle" as he was known on the CB Radio, along with friends, took on the issue of race and rodeos one Texas arena at a time.