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Something the Lord Made

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Something the Lord Made (TV Movie 2004) - IMDb

But the real problem with Something the Lord Made may be that surgical innovations, however technically astonishing and socially useful, are just not that interesting to watch. The procedure the two men work on together involves a series of practice operations on dogs, in an attempt to duplicate and fix the heart defect that causes cyanotic, or "blue," babies. As a result, much of the film centers around Blalock and Thomas trying to create cyanotic dogs in the lab, leading to innumerable close-ups of shaved furry tummies and countless opportunities for lines like, "Viv, you did it! The dog's gums are blue!" or my favorite, "This dog is only faintly blue at best." No film whose emotional climax involves watching an infant's face slowly turn from blue to pink as inspirational music swells in the background can fail to tug occasionally at the heartstrings, but Something the Lord Made misses more often than it hits. Rickman and Def, like the exacting craftsmen they play, may have put in countless hours at the HBO operating table, but this dog is only faintly blue at best.

This website represents a historical snapshot of material produced for the premiere of the HBO film, “Something the Lord Made,” which was released in 2004.

Something the Lord Made - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  • Tells the story of the extraordinary 34-year partnership which begins in Depression Era Nashville in 1930, when Blalock hires Thomas as an assistant in his Vanderbilt University lab, expecting him merely to perform janitorial work. But Thomas' remarkable manual dexterity and scientific acumen shatter Blalock's expectations, and Thomas rapidly becomes indispensable as a research partner to Blalock in his first daring forays into heart surgery. The film traces the groundbreaking work the two men undertake when they move in 1941 from Vanderbilt to Johns Hopkins, an institution where the only black employees are janitors and where Thomas must enter by the back door. Together, they boldly attack the devastating heart problem of Tetralogy of Fallot, also known as Blue Baby Syndrome, and in so doing they open the field of heart surgery. The film dramatizes their race to save dying Blue Babies against the background of a Jim Crow (Racial Segregation) America, illuminating the nuanced and complex relationship the two sustain. Thomas earns Blalock's unalloyed respect, with Blalock praising the results of Thomas' surgical skill as being "like something the Lord made", and insisting that Thomas coach him through the first Blue Baby surgery over the protests of Hopkins administrators.

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  • Something the Lord Made (2004) - Rotten Tomatoes

    Tells the story of the extraordinary 34-year partnership which begins in Depression Era Nashville in 1930, when Blalock hires Thomas as an assistant in his Vanderbilt University lab, expecting him merely to perform janitorial work. But Thomas' remarkable manual dexterity and scientific acumen shatter Blalock's expectations, and Thomas rapidly becomes indispensable as a research partner to Blalock in his first daring forays into heart surgery. The film traces the groundbreaking work the two men undertake when they move in 1941 from Vanderbilt to Johns Hopkins, an institution where the only black employees are janitors and where Thomas must enter by the back door. Together, they boldly attack the devastating heart problem of Tetralogy of Fallot, also known as Blue Baby Syndrome, and in so doing they open the field of heart surgery. The film dramatizes their race to save dying Blue Babies against the background of a Jim Crow (Racial Segregation) America, illuminating the nuanced and complex relationship the two sustain. Thomas earns Blalock's unalloyed respect, with Blalock praising the results of Thomas' surgical skill as being "like something the Lord made", and insisting that Thomas coach him through the first Blue Baby surgery over the protests of Hopkins administrators.

    is a 2004 about the black cardiac pioneer and his complex and volatile partnership with white surgeon Alfred Blalock, the world famous "Blue Baby doctor" who pioneered modern heart surgery. Based on the National Magazine Award-winning Washingtonian magazine article "Like Something the Lord Made" by Katie McCabe, the film was directed by and written by and .