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"The Snow Child" provides a feminist perspective

The Snow Child: A Novel

$15.00


News and Notes from Eowyn Ivey, Author of "The Snow Child"

Named after a character in Tolkien’s , was raised in Alaska and continues to live there with her husband and two daughters. Educated at and the , Ivey began her career as a reporter for the . Her award-winning articles have been published in the , , and other publications. Currently, Ivey works at , an independent bookstore. The Snow Child is Ivey’s debut novel.

In the past week, I've gotten reports from people across the country who have spotted The Snow Child. My grandmother's dear friend in Florida reported her copy had arrived. Good friends in Washington State tweeted they were beginning to read the book. And a bookseller friend in Chicago shared a photo of The Snow Child on display at the Barnes & Noble he manages.

“The Snow Child” by Angela Carter

  1. The Snow Child (Europe).

  2. Link to Modus Liebinc, in Latin, the oldest European version of the "Snow Child" story, from a tenth-century manuscript. Opens in a new window.

  3. The Child of Snow (France, Les cent nouvelles nouvelles).

  4. The Ice Child (Germany, Johannes Pauli).

  5. Link to Der Eyszapf, in German, by the Meistersinger Hans Sachs (1494-1576). Opens in a new window.

  6. The Snow Child (England, Thomas North).

  7. A Poor Mariner of Gaeta (Italy, Poggio Bracciolini).

  8. A Twelve-Month Child (Italy, Poggio Bracciolini).

  9. Ten Cradles (England, John Taylor).

[…] Angela Carter, The Snow Child […]

A bewitching tale of heartbreak and hope set in 1920s Alaska, THE SNOW CHILD was a top ten bestseller in hardback and paperback, and went on to be a Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Alaska, the 1920s. Jack and Mabel have staked everything on a fresh start in a remote homestead, but the wilderness is a stark place, and Mabel is haunted by the baby she lost many years before. When a little girl appears mysteriously on their land, each is filled with wonder, but also foreboding: is she what she seems, and can they find room in their hearts for her? Written with the clarity and vividness of the Russian fairy tale from which it takes its inspiration, The Snow Child is an instant classic.

Monday morning, after running some errands in town, I drove by Fireside Books. The shop was closed and the lights off, but something caught my eye — in the front window, dozens of copies of my novel The Snow Child.