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The Story of the Goblins Who Stole a Sexton

The Story of the Goblins Who Stole a Sexton (Annotated)

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The Story of the Goblins who stole a Sexton ..

American Notes
The Battle of Life
The Chimes: A Goblin Story
A Christmas Tree
A Dinner at Poplar Walk
Doctor Marigold’s Prescriptions
A Flight
Frozen Deep
George Silverman’s Explanation
Going into Society
The Haunted Man
Holiday Romance
The Holly-Tree
Hunted Down
The Long Voyage
Master Humphrey’s Clock
A Message from the Sea
Mrs. Lirriper’s Legacy
Public Life of Mr. Trumble, Once Mayor of Mudfog
Sketches by Boz
The Story of the Goblins Who Stole a Sexton
Sunday under Three Heads
Tom Tiddler’s Ground
Travelling Abroad – City of London Churches
The Uncommercial Traveller
Wreck of the Golden Mary

Dickens' Christmas Spirits: A Christmas Carol and Other Tales. This elegant hardcover edition gathers seven spirited Yuletide fables, including "A Christmas Carol," "The Cricket on the Hearth," "The Chimes," "The Haunted Man and The Ghost's Bargain," "The Seven Poor Travellers," "The Story of the Goblins Who Stole a Sexton," and "The Holly-Tree." Over 60 charming illustrations enhance this book, which will delight Dickens' fans as well as all lovers of Christmas stories.. Price: $17.15

THE STORY OF THE GOBLINS WHO STOLE A SEXTON

THE STORY OF THE GOBLINS WHO STOLE A SEXTON [ p ..

Set of seventeen 'life model' magic lantern slides which was used in telling the story of "Gabriel Grub; or the Story of the Goblins who Stole a Sexton" using a magic lantern projector. A booklet accompanies the set of slides. Incomplete set of slides.

The story was based on a chapter of Charles Dickens' "Pickwick Papers", originally published in serialised form between March 1836 and October 1837.

It wasn't the first Christmas story Dickens wrote. It wasn't even the first Christmas ghost story Dickens wrote. He'd already written 'The Story of the Goblins Who Stole a Sexton,' featuring miserly Gabriel Grub, an inset tale in Dickens's first ever published novel, The Pickwick Papers (1836-7). The tale shares many of the narrative features which would turn up a few years later in A Christmas Carol: the misanthropic villain, the Christmas Eve setting, the presence of the supernatural (goblins/ghosts), the use of visions which the main character is forced to witness, the focus on poverty and family, and, most importantly, the reforming of the villain into a better person at the close of the story.