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Zu Zu Ginger Snaps Trolley Cards

Zu Zu Ginger Snaps Clown Advertisement Ad (AKH-712)

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Yay! You're now following zu zu ginger snaps in your .

I think Vogeler and Meyer are getting mixed up here with the Zulu people as they picture a native or ‘Injun’ in their advertising. Zu Zu was actually an early name for Ginger Snaps. The Zu Zu Ginger Snaps by National Biscuit Company (later Nabisco) advertisement below is from The Fort Wayne News in 1902. Some Zu Zu Ginger Snaps biscuit boxes are pictured at the top of the post.

The featured variegated colorway in this pattern, Zuzu’s Petals, refers to a famous scene from the film It’s a Wonderful Life, a holiday classic and one of my favorite films. I have often wondered how George and Mary Bailey managed to name their children Janie, Pete and Tommy… and then Zuzu, until I read that the name “Zuzu” came from the Zu Zu Ginger Snaps. And then it all made sense.

ANTIQUE ZU ZU GINGER SNAPS TIN 1982 NABISCO REPLICA | eBay

A nicely delineated clown doesn't mind the rain because he has all the Zu Zu Ginger Snaps he wants. From the June, 1910 issue of the DESIGNER.

Source: Mariangela Buch
Restoration by: Mariangela Buch

Date: 08/15/2009
Owner: Magazine Art Gallery Administrator
Full size: 650x948

Zu Zu Ginger Snaps | Antique Advertising

Product Description
Zu Zu Ginger Snaps Display: Scarce, early, cardboard die-cut stand-up countertop display for National Biscuit Co.’s (Nabisco) Zu Zu brand ginger snap cookies. Has easel on backside w/ shelf section at top for holding the included original dummy display box. Has nice colors and displays quite well, although top section of cap is missing and there is some light staining and small tear spot area at base. Tough one to grade, but C. 7.5++ appearance seems about right (box excellent).

Clearly on the Zu Zu Ginger Snaps package the name Zu Zu is two words each capitalized. But I have seen this name spelled different ways from official sources. Even though this may speak more to the early days of branding than that of sloppiness of sources, it’s mildly interesting: